GP Web Client: Rendering Issue – Some Facts


Almost a month back, I had posted my GP web client test drive results on how the client is rendered on Mac based browsers and possible issue with Silverlight plugin. I am probably wrong.

Everything works other than pictures; that’s what I had found. Upon drilling down further, what I realised is that it sounds obvious that it doesn’t work on Mac based browsers. Reason: Native Pictures.

Definition of Native Picture says following:

Snip20131230_12

Consider, for instance, the following snapshot of GP login window on a web client rendered on Mac Safari:

Snip20131230_10

It’s not shown. Initially I thought it was something to do with Silverlight rendering. But not exactly. It’s because, this picture is a Native Picture. And by definition, it’s specific to Windows OS. Look at this picture definition below:

Snip20131230_9

Apparently, by nature, it’s NOT supposed to show up on any OS other than Windows.

It’s not just this picture. Lookup Button icons, Note icons are all Native Picture types. And due to that, they are not going to render on any other OS. And if I am not mistaken, this will remain as it is at least till next major version of GP.

Those who implement GP web client MUST be aware of this.

VAIDY

OFF-TOPIC: Show Hidden Files & Folders in Mac OS X Mavericks


I had been struggling with this for sometime. I wanted to create a USB installer for Mavericks and was not able to get thru’ a step where I had to show hidden files and folders.

In Windows OS, it’s a simple step which is available graphically to either show or hide hidden files and folders. But in Mac OS X, for some reason, this has to be achieved by typing a command on Terminal. Following is the command that is required to enable showing hidden files and folders:

defaults write com.apple.finder AppleShowAllFiles TRUE
killall Finder

So, those who struggle to get it done, above is your key to unlock this.

VAIDY

OFF-TOPIC: MacBook, Mac OS & Wired Memory


I got a new MacBook Pro couple of days back and needless to say, I am more than excited to use it.

I have been a Mac OS user for the past 1 year, as I had already replaced my personal computing machine from an old warrior named Lenovo N300 to an amazing MacBook Air. Been driven by that experience, I had always been yearning for my work computer to get changed to a MacBook too.

This topic is more about how Mac OS utilises the System Memory (RAM) to it’s fullest advantage and how it keeps any MacBook machine highly efficient. When we look at the Activity Monitor (equivalent to Task Manager on Windows OS), you would find something like below:

Screen Shot 2013-01-15 at 5.48.57 AM

 

I was so intrigued by the term Wired Memory as all other terms made some sense to my H/W & OS expertise. Checked with my friend (who else but Google), and he as usual returned several results. One post stood out from all other.

A post written by Alex on his blog Bits about Bytes shed some light on this. Read the post here: Is my Mac using too much memory???

It’s a very old post (posted precisely in the year 2007), but an amazing post about the topic which I was interested in. In case some people like me, who has shifted to Mac OS (or going to shift), I thought this post would be for them and would be useful to know about your Mac.

Happy “Mac”ing.

VAIDY

OFF TOPIC: Why I can’t use the File Sharing wizard?


Alright… Another off-topic one, but is worth sharing. This post again shows how much Customers are aware about technology and go that extra mile to get educated on systems/software that they use.

The Old New Thing has got a post which explains a flaw in Windows Vista (yeah I can hear you yelling at me as soon as you heard that word) and Windows Server 2008, but got fixed in Windows 7 (are you OK now?) and Windows Server 2008 R2.

The post is about why you can’t use File Sharing wizard if you exclude inheritable permissions from a folder’s parent.

Just in case, people are wondering why this thing never work on Windows Vista (ok ok, that’s the last time I would utter that word) and Windows Server 2008, you have one more reason to dump *you know what*.

VAIDY