OFF-TOPIC: Change Power Button Behaviour in OS X Mavericks


Whenever I accidentally press the power button on my MacBook, it switches off the display. This behaviour change happened from OS X Mavericks (10.9).

Earlier it used to let us choose with following options:

Power Button Options

OSXDaily.com has got a workaround for this trouble. It does not straightaway enable these options the moment you press the power button, but it prevents OS X Mavericks from switching the display off, which is far more relieving.

To invoke the above power button options: press power button continuously for a second or two.

Thanks OSXDaily.com.

VAIDY

OFF-TOPIC: Batch Print Multiple Files in Mac OS X Without Opening Them – Jesse Chapman @jessechapman


One of my users use Mac OS X Mavericks and his major concern was to batch print files in a folder without opening each one of them. He somehow (?!?!?!) trusted my expertise in Mac OS to find a solution.

My best friend, Google, came to my rescue again. I got this gem of a post by Jesse Chapman (sorry Jesse, I tried getting a profile page of yours, but could only get your twitter page) on his blog wait, really? that saved my day.

Read it here: How to batch print multiple files in Mac OS X without opening them.

Though the post is for Mac OS Snow Leopard, it still works charmingly on Mavericks. Thanks a bunch, Jesse.

Upside; I am now considered an expert in Mac OS by at least one Mac user in this world :-DDownside; I may get more support requests with Mac OS :-P.

But hey, I am not even complaining.

VAIDY

OFF-TOPIC: Show Hidden Files & Folders in Mac OS X Mavericks


I had been struggling with this for sometime. I wanted to create a USB installer for Mavericks and was not able to get thru’ a step where I had to show hidden files and folders.

In Windows OS, it’s a simple step which is available graphically to either show or hide hidden files and folders. But in Mac OS X, for some reason, this has to be achieved by typing a command on Terminal. Following is the command that is required to enable showing hidden files and folders:

defaults write com.apple.finder AppleShowAllFiles TRUE
killall Finder

So, those who struggle to get it done, above is your key to unlock this.

VAIDY

OFF-TOPIC: Snip For Mac OS X – A Snipping Tool Alternative


This is another off-topic. But I wanted to highlight this most handy application called Snip, developed by Tencent Technology (Shenzhen) Company Limited and is also available on Mac App Store.

Snip20130209_1

Those PC users, who also used to be Snipping Tool dependants, and then became Mac OS user, would love to have an application in Mac OS X which would compensate Snipping Tool’s absence.

I used to crib about the lack of an application that I would use to do screen capturing and post-processing those captures. This tool Snip, which I came to know very recently, has done what other applications on Mac platform couldn’t.

We have built-in capturing commands in Mac OS X, such as SHIFT+CMD+4 (to capture a portion of screen), but those commands would simply take the screenshot and immediately save it on your desktop. You then have to reopen it on some other graphics tool to post-process it, such as narrating or simply painting on some text which you do not want to show to others.

This tool is amazingly simple and does exactly what you need. It just sits on that menu bar with a customisable keyboard shortcut to invoke a screen capture.

Go to the official website (link is provided in the beginning of this post) and know more about it.

Trust me, you would most certainly fall in love with this application, if you do tons of screen capturing on your day-to-day Mac OS usage.

UPDATE: There is one more app that is FREE on Mac App Store; named Share Bucket. I think it’s a serious competitor for all currently available apps.

VAIDY

OFF-TOPIC: MacBook, Mac OS & Wired Memory


I got a new MacBook Pro couple of days back and needless to say, I am more than excited to use it.

I have been a Mac OS user for the past 1 year, as I had already replaced my personal computing machine from an old warrior named Lenovo N300 to an amazing MacBook Air. Been driven by that experience, I had always been yearning for my work computer to get changed to a MacBook too.

This topic is more about how Mac OS utilises the System Memory (RAM) to it’s fullest advantage and how it keeps any MacBook machine highly efficient. When we look at the Activity Monitor (equivalent to Task Manager on Windows OS), you would find something like below:

Screen Shot 2013-01-15 at 5.48.57 AM

 

I was so intrigued by the term Wired Memory as all other terms made some sense to my H/W & OS expertise. Checked with my friend (who else but Google), and he as usual returned several results. One post stood out from all other.

A post written by Alex on his blog Bits about Bytes shed some light on this. Read the post here: Is my Mac using too much memory???

It’s a very old post (posted precisely in the year 2007), but an amazing post about the topic which I was interested in. In case some people like me, who has shifted to Mac OS (or going to shift), I thought this post would be for them and would be useful to know about your Mac.

Happy “Mac”ing.

VAIDY